COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

Volunteering
Sphere on Spiral Stairs

Posted Dec 21, 2020 6:01 AM

Bill Oyet, back row, of the United Way of Ellis County with a family who benefited from the Shop with a Cop program on Sunday. Courtesy photo

Needy families can still get toys from United Way during distribution on Tuesday

By CRISTINA JANNEY
Hays Post

The local organization Can You See Me?, the Schmidt Foundation and the United Way of Ellis County cooperated for a Shop with a Cop event for needy families on Sunday and Monday. Walmart was also a partner in the program and gave a gift bag to all of the families.

Can You See Me? Inc.

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CHARITIES COME TOGETHER TO GIVE FAMILIES MERRY CHRISTMAS

 
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Demetrius Chance speaks at a Can You See Me event. He created the group in February and has sponsored several events, including Shop with a Cop. 

By JAMES BELL
Hays Post

Soon, 20 families in need will be given a very special holiday gift though a partnership between Can You See Me?, the Schmidt Foundation and the United Way of Ellis County for the first Ellis County Shop with a Cop.

On Sunday and Monday, the families will be given an allotted amount of money to purchase whatever they need for the holidays at the Walmart, 4301 Vine.

While sharing the name with a popular national program, organizer Demetrius Chance said locally he wanted to do more, especially with ongoing tensions surrounding police and issues of racial inequality across the U.S.

Can You See Me? Inc.

HAYS COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS PARTNER FOR
'SHOP WITH A COP'

 

COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS FOCUS OF FIRST BIPOC EVENT

Posted Oct 26, 2020 8:49 AM

By JAMES BELL
Hays Post

Area residents will gather at Breathe Coffee House, 703B Main, for "Can We Just Talk" — the first meeting of the black, indigenous, and people of color community of Ellis County.

The informal meeting is designed to be a way to create a stronger community by enhancing the understanding of racial issues in a nearly entirely white community.

“This event grew from the development of a virtual community I created in August 2020," said Nuchelle Chance, who organized the group with husband Demetrius Chance. "As a black woman, and specifically an underrepresented minority in Hays, I am a firsthand witness to the fact that black, brown, gay, Muslim, etc … people are not always made to feel welcomed and truly included."

Can You See Me? Inc.

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SMALL AND MID-SIZED TOWNS IN KANSAS AND MISSOURI ARE SEEING MASS PROTESTS LIKE NEVER BEFORE

Demetrius and Nuchelle Chance helped organize a protest in Hays, Kan., which drew over 200 people. 

‘Most change doesn’t happen on the macro scale’ 

In political science, the cycle of contention is the idea that for a period of time, protests will gain momentum until inevitable decline. There is a higher chance of political change during the height of a movement’s momentum.

Can You See Me? Inc.

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PROTESTS OVER POLICE BRUTALITY IN MINNEAPOLIS REACH HAYS

Posted Jun 01, 2020, 6:01 AM

By JAMES BELL
Hays Post

As protests across the country continue after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer, over 100 people gathered at the intersection 27th and Vine in Hays on Sunday afternoon holding signs of support for an end to perceived police brutality and race inequality.

Can You See Me? Inc.

 
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CYSM PANEL DISCUSSION

Demetrius Chance organized a group of Fort Hays State University faculty for a panel discussion as part of a project through the National Alliance on Mental Illness on Campus. His name for the project – “Can You See Me?” – was personal. 

“When I was dealing with my trauma and battles with mental illness, I wondered if people were depicting who I was because of my illness,” he said. “Were they seeing me as a person or seeing me for my scars?”

The seven-panel members, all from different ethnic groups – including natives of Taiwan, Uganda, Brazil, and India – answered pre-written questions while addressing a packed house in the FHSU'S Memorial Union’s Black and Gold Room.

Can You See Me? Inc.